Strange tomatoes

Whilst doing my garden check yesterday evening, I noticed that some of the tomatoes looked less than healthy.

image

Malformed tomatoes

I did an internet search but could reach no firm conclusions about what could be the cause of the malformations. That said, I don’t think it is catching. Rather, it is probably down to an exceptionally dry September, so strange as it felt to be watering in October that’s what I did in an attempt some damage limitation.

Apparently, the weather is set to change after tomorrow, so it might be time to take the bulk of the tomatoes in. It would be heart-breaking to lose the crop and as they haven’t gone red by now, there is little chance of that happening now. In any case, I was growing them for chutney, so I think I will get on with that!

© Helen Butt, October 2014

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About Helen

I have always been interesting in living a more environmentally friendly lifestyle and used to do what I could. Now, I have come to realise that we have reached such a point in terms of environmental degradation that it is more important - perhaps - to focus on building resilience. I therefore do as much as I can to reuse, grow my own and encourage a supportive community, for example. I also keep reading and learning all the time.
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18 Responses to Strange tomatoes

  1. triedandglue says:

    Could it be blossom end rot? It’s the closest looking thing to the picture in the kitchen gardening for beginners book I am reading.

    • Helen says:

      I had thought that but it’s not on the bottom. Thanks anyway for your suggestion. I think I should pick the tomatoes very soon, just in case it is something which could spread…

  2. Such a shame, but as you said, cut the bad bits away and turn the rest into chutney! I’m sure if you put some of the healthier green tomatoes in a sunny windowsill, they will ripen nicely. It usually works! 🙂

  3. If it is only 5 tomatoes that were affected, then you did a good job. You still had a successful crop. It is a shame they can’t ripen on the vine, but like you said it is no problem to take them in to ripen and or use green. I hope that you post your chutney recipe. I still have tomatoes that are almost ready to pick. We are coming to the last of the season too. I would like to try and make some to try chutney for the first time. I want to see if we like it.
    Honey

  4. drofmit4108 says:

    Those toms have been physically damaged…
    a bird peck when small will do it…
    ir a period of drought and sun…
    followed by watering…
    either you or the clouds above…
    it isn’t rot.. but can be followed by such…
    as other’s have said, cut it out…
    the rest will cook.
    The perfect, unripe toms can be ripened in a drawer with a ripe bananananana…
    but put that in a dish as it needs to be left to get really over-ripe…
    and you’ll both want to avoid it damaging the drawer…
    and be able to slide it into the compost after you’ve finished with it…
    once some start to ripen, they will start giving off the same gas and take over from the banana.
    An alternative is to rig up some “drying” lines across a south facing window and peg the toms up by their stalks…
    that does the same thing… we’ve used both methods successfully.

    • Helen says:

      Thanks for all this! Good to know what has been causing the strange effects on the tomatoes – I think you are right on both accounts. I like the idea of stringing the green toms up – got several kilos to ripen, though the banana trick has given me some nice red ones for salad this week 🙂

      • drofmit4108 says:

        I would recommend joining the West Yorkshire Organic Group…
        if you aren’t already a member that is.
        If you are, read no further!!
        They have a late summer show in Saltaire’s Victoria Hall which is always worth a visit.
        Terry Marshall always has a stand…
        his knowledge of tomatoes and their foibles are readily offered…
        as are samples to taste of different varieties…
        it was through him we now grow Vanessa, a bog standard tomato… but what flavour…
        and Nectar, a wonderful cherry tomato.
        This year, though we grew seventy plants… of twenty different varieties…
        FAR too many… and never again… touch wood.
        However, we got ‘early’ blight… so we got a crop that would have come from about half the number we actually grew.
        WYOG also have a potato day in the same venue in February… to try a variety we used to buy five or six tubers at [2009 prces – ten whole pennies!!]…
        but also perfect for garden growing spaces.

        • Helen says:

          Thanks for the recommendation! I am not in fact a member of WYOG, though the name rings a bell. Ie I seem to remember finding the group through an intetnet search at some point but I’m not sure what happened after that. Life, I guess!

          Sorry to hear about your tomatoes but I am glad you still got a crop 🙂

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