Forgotten apples

Last autumn, I noticed an apple tree near where I park my car for work which was laden with apples. No one was picking them and they were falling all over the road.

This year, I have come across a more extra-ordinary situation. My village Britain-in-Bloom group had planted various fruit trees on Canal Trust land. So, the trees are owned by one group but not being looked after by anyone it seems, fenced off and surrounded by nettles.


Of course, trees by water is no bad thing but the situation begs the question of why they are fruit trees and why they aren’t being made accessible to the public.

Fortunately, we did find a wild tree elsewhere, along with rosehips, so my friend and I had a productive forage. Sadly, we were too late for the blackberries but I will try to remember this for next year. At least I’ve still got preserves to use up from last year’s pickings.

About Helen

I have always been interesting in living a more environmentally friendly lifestyle and used to do what I could. Now, I have come to realise that we have reached such a point in terms of environmental degradation that it is more important - perhaps - to focus on building resilience. I therefore do as much as I can to reuse, grow my own and encourage a supportive community, for example. I also keep reading and learning all the time.
This entry was posted in foraging and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Forgotten apples

  1. gaiainaction says:

    I love the idea that fruit trees are grown in public areas, but they should then be made available to the public of course. Can you find out if you would be allowed to pick some Helen?

I love to read about your own experiences and any other feedback you have, so look forward to your comments below.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.