Out with the neem spray

It’s that time of the year where I can do an hour’s work in the garden after work. So, now the wind has abated, I rushed out to direct sow some broad beans.

Then I turned my attention to the currant bushes. I dare say it will be a while before the aphids are about but I really want to give my currants the best chance of avoiding attack, so I sprayed them with neem oil to ward off the pests.

This hasn’t truly worked in the past but perhaps I started the anti-aphid regime too late before. And the largest bush, pictured above, still produced enough fruit in 2018 for a strawberry and red currant jam. However, the bushes are smaller than I would have expected after four years (I think), although it could be the soil or the life being sucked out of them by the strawberries.

It’s difficult to know for sure because I don’t have the space to experiment with control specimens. So, I’ll continue to operate blind and hope for the best.

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About Helen

I have always been interesting in living a more environmentally friendly lifestyle and used to do what I could. Now, I have come to realise that we have reached such a point in terms of environmental degradation that it is more important - perhaps - to focus on building resilience. I therefore do as much as I can to reuse, grow my own and encourage a supportive community, for example. I also keep reading and learning all the time.
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2 Responses to Out with the neem spray

  1. I have not had an aphid problem on my currants so can’t help but I doubt if your spray will do any harm so it is worth a try. Good luck!

    • Helen says:

      I’m not sure why the currants are so affected. It used to be the apple tree but that has either grown stronger and is fighting them off or the scent of the currants is luring them away perhaps.

      I am told that neem doesn’t affect pollinators – unless they were unfortunately present during spraying, hence in part why I sprayed at dusk. It suffocates the insects that are sprayed on but isn’t poisonous to bees and such who may come along afterwards.

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