First attempt at homemade dandelion coffee

Following my post ‘Herbs for Health’, I duly got my garden fork out yesterday and dug up a number of dandelion roots and, after giving them a good scrub, put them in the dehydrator. It’s a shame I had dug out some of the biggest roots in the summer, as they had now produced lots of little ones where the root had not been completely removed.

The internet threw up a number of recipes, which were all basically the same and none of which I followed. For a start, once the roots were dehydrated, I got the pestle and mortar out

before roasting them.

I didn’t think I could roast them, anyway, since my oven doesn’t work. Then I hit on the idea of using the breadmaker

and was pleased with the outcome. In fact, a whole new world of possibilities has opened up but I will explore these another time.

One of the recipes I’d read on line suggested six tablespoons of dandelion coffee for a cafetière (presumably a big one), which stuck me as excessive. In any case, there wasn’t enough ground and roasted dandelion root, so I decided one spoonful would have to do.

Also, I felt that a good place to start would be to heat the coffee up in milk in the manner I had seen tea being prepared in Pakistan.

Upon taking the first sip, I felt that something was missing and toyed with the idea of adding some sugar or honey. I didn’t want to go down the route of adding unnecessary refined carbohydrate to my diet, though, so opted for ground cinnamon instead.

And most delicious it was. So, where am I going to find more dandelions?

About Helen

I have always been interesting in living a more environmentally friendly lifestyle and used to do what I could. Now, I have come to realise that we have reached such a point in terms of environmental degradation that it is more important - perhaps - to focus on building resilience. I therefore do as much as I can to reuse, grow my own and encourage a supportive community, for example. I also keep reading and learning all the time.
This entry was posted in edible weeds, In the kitchen and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

20 Responses to First attempt at homemade dandelion coffee

  1. Nice Helen! Apparently it’s very good for you too!

  2. Over Soil says:

    I love dandelions. There is just so much to be had from these overlooked beauties. I used a big spoon of dandelion syrup today, in the bottom/top of my upsidedown apple crumble pudding. I’m sure the recipe for the syrup (vegan honey) is on my blog somewhere. As for the right type of leaf to have in a salad, is it the toothy one or the straight edge? I’m always wondering which is the bitterer one.

    • Helen says:

      I have a jar of dandelion syrup somewhere in my cupboard. It needs opening and eating as I got it two years ago now.

      As for the leaves, I don’t know which would be the bitterest. Trials and error I guess?

      • Over Soil says:

        Someone somewhere must have already done the taste tests, right? You know I will look now (rummage in the google search thingy) oooh now there’s a thing, apparently 4 inches in length or smaller and not stringy, as they’re probably not ripe yet and will be far too bitter.
        Oh and before the flower grows and blooms.
        Ooooh and the brighter the green the better, growing in a well drained soil and in shade. Well there’s something I hope to remember, but you know I think they all are probably going to be good for me in moderation and of course only those far away from a dog walking path. 😂 🤣 😁

  3. Well done. Cinnamon was a good choice

  4. Glad it worked despite all the improvisations.

  5. gaiainaction says:

    Thank you for the tip about the breadmaker Helen, clever! Your use of Cinnamon sounds lovely. When I made dandelion coffee recently I was told to simmer it gently for 20 minutes with the addition of a lump of butter. Then sieve the pieces out and froth it up in the nutrabullet. The end result was strong and very creamy, delicious.

I love to read about your own experiences and any other feedback you have, so look forward to your comments below.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.